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Sylvania 2N34 Transistor

An early 1950s transistor using the precursor to the EIA/JEDEC part numbering system.

The ideaEdit

Creating a small, cheep and durable replacement for valves (vacuum tubes).

ManufacturingEdit

N\A, but probably akin to then Western practices.

StatsEdit

American 2N34 PNP Germanium Alloy Junction Transistor.
Category. Statistic.
Designed in. 1.
Made in. 1953 (experimental pan-corporate test variant) and 1955 for the standard Sylvania 2N34 PNP version.
Transistors per chip. 1.
Power supply. Variuose and battery power..
Still in use. No.
Nationality. American.

This transistor would lead to cheaper and smaller radios and TVs like the famous American Zenith Royal 500 of the 1950s. It was one of America's first moves in to the modern elctrial bussiness and it was seen as a national icon at the time.

It was meant to be replaced by ICs like the Philips TAA320 integrated circuit, so the circuit would have 1, not 3 cans on it!

Like all ICs, it is made to a JEDEC standard and ID numbering code after 1953. JEDEC was founded in 1958 as a joint activity between EIA and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) to develop standards for semiconductor devices. NEMA discontinued its involvement in 1979.

The European Pro-Electron semiconductor numbering system originated in a similar way from the older  Mullard–Philips tube designation

CasingEdit

A flat, 3 metal legged, painted, metal can full of a glassy type of non-epoxy resin.

Also seeEdit

SourcesEdit

  1. http://semiconductormuseum.com/PhotoGallery/PhotoGallery_2N35.htm
  2. http://www.wylie.org.uk/technology/semics/2Nseries/2Nseries.htm
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2N107
  4. http://transparentsound.com/transistors/vintage-transistors/rca/rca.htm
  5. http://semiconductormuseum.com/PhotoGallery/PhotoGallery_2N35.htm
  6. http://semiconductormuseum.com/MuseumLibrary/HistoryOfTransistorsVolume1.pdf
  7. http://www.wylie.org.uk/technology/semics/2Nseries/2Nseries.htm
  8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_junction_transistor
  9. https://sites.google.com/site/transistorhistory/Home/us-semiconductor-manufacturers/rca-history
  10. http://www.transparentsound.com/transistors/vintage-transistors/Sylvania/sylvania.htm
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