FANDOM


Titan II launch

A Titan II missile (a type of ICBM) being launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base.

Why were they used on Hiroshima and NagasakiEdit

  1. To avoid an invasion of Japan in which ~5,000,000 Japanese, ~1,000,000 Americans and ~1,500,000 other Allied forces would die.
  2. To shorten the war by ~6 months and thus pre-empting the soviet plans to invade Hokkaido.
  3. To test a new weapon on a city.
  4. To scare the USSR.
  5. To intimidate the rest of the word with.
  6. To get necrophilia high for those who let it be used?
  7. Parts of the US military and government had a racist agenda that was fixated with the mass killing Orientals.

The ultimate launch controlEdit

They can be only lanced by the relevant personnel using a 'nuclear briefcase'. the inenty of 4 of them are known: Nuclear briefcase (UK) Cheget (USSR\Russia), «mobile base» (France) or Nuclear football (USA).

Atomic warheads through out historyEdit

According to WikipediaEdit

Global nuclear weapons stockpiles (1945-2025).
Country.1945.1950.1955.1960.1965.1970.1975.1980.1985.1990.1995.2000.2005.2014.Projections.
United States. 2 299 2,422 18,638 31,139 26,008 27,519 23,368 21,392 10,904 10,577 8,360 7,700 7,260 3,620 (for 2022)
Russia. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37,000 27,000 21,500 17,000 7,500 3,350 (for 2022)
Soviet Union. 0 5 200 1,605 6,129 11,643 19,055 30,062 39,197 37,000 0 0 0 0 0
United Kingdom. 0 0 14 42 436 394 492 492 422 422 422 281 281 215 180 (for around 2025)
France. 0 0 0 0 32 36 188 250 360 505 500 470 350 300 N/A
China. 0 0 0 0 5 75 180 205 243 232 234 232 235 260 150-220 (for 2020)
Israel. 0 0 0 0 0 8 20 31 42 53 63 72 80 80 65-85 (for 2020)
India. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 7 14 28 44 90-110 50-70 (for 2020)
South Africa. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 0
Pakistan. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 13 28 38 100-120 150-200 (for 2021)
North Korea. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-1 0-2 0-2 8 6-8 N/A
Kazakhstan. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,410 (1991) 0 0 0 0 0
Ukraine. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,240 (1991) 0 0 0 0 0
Belarus. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 At least 81 (1991) 0 0 0 0 0
Estonia. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~10 (1991) 0 0 0 0 0
Uzbekistan. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~5 (1991)  0 0 0 0 0
Armenian. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~5 (1991)  0 0 0 0 0
Georgia. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~5 (1991)  0 0 0 0 0
Lithuania. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~12 (1991)  0 0 0 0 0

Acording to other online sourcesEdit

2020Edit

  1. N. Korea ~10-16, probably 10-12.
  2. Iran ~1-4, probably 2-4.

2017Edit

  1. USA 6,800 warheads
  2. Russia 7,000 warheads
  3. UK 215 warheads
  4. France 300 warheads
  5. China 270 warheads
  6. India 110–120 warheads
  7. Pakistan 120-130 warheads
  8. Israel 80 warheads
  9. NK <10 warheads

2015Edit

  1. Russia 7,500
  2. USA 7,200
  3. France 300
  4. China 250
  5. UK 215
  6. Pakistan 100-120
  7. India 90-110
  8. Israel 80
  9. NK under 10, but probably 5-8

2014Edit

  1. Russia 5,000
  2. USA 4,400
  3. France 290
  4. China 240
  5. UK 195
  6. Israel 80
  7. Pakistan 200
  8. India 150
  9. Nk ~6

2013Edit

  1. USA 4804-7,700
  2. Russia (USSR or RSSFR) 4480-8,500
  3. France 300
  4. China 250
  5. UK 225
  6. Pakistan 120
  7. India 110
  8. Israel 80?
  9. NK 5?

1983Edit

  1. USA 23,500
  2. Russia (USSR) 36,000
  3. UK 320
  4. France 280
  5. China 380

1968Edit

Sweden had planned 100 or so since 1948 for use on Poland, Soviets invading Finland and the Baltic States. They had reportedly made 10-20 (popular opinion says 16) of them by 1968.

1947Edit

  1. USA 14.
  2. USSR 7.
  3. Anglo-Canadian 1.
  4. Anglo-Australian tests bomb 1

1946Edit

  1. USA 6.
  2. USSR 2.
  3. Anglo-Canadian test bomb 1
  4. Anglo-Australian tests only.

1943Edit

  1. USA tests only.
  2. Anglo-Canadian tests only.
  3. Anglo-Australian tests only.
  4. Japan tests only.
  5. Italy tests only.
  6. USSR tests only.
  7. Nazi Germany tests only.

Also seeEdit

Worlds Top 5 Nuclear Power Comparison 2015

Worlds Top 5 Nuclear Power Comparison 2015.

Worlds Top 5 Nuclear Power Comparison 2015.

  1. Cold War
  2. Atomic videos
  3. Atomic\nuclear war
  4. Cuban Missile Crisis
  5. Atomic warfare information notes.
  6. Bomb blast effects
  7. Chalk River nuclear accident
  8. 1961 Goldsboro B-52 crash
  9. 1966 Palomares B-52 crash
  10. 1968 Thule Air Base B-52 crash
  11. 1987 Goiânia accident
  12. Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant accidents
  13. Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant accident
  14. Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah 1 plant accident
  15. Detroit experimental reactor accident
  16. Lubmin nuclear power complex accidents
  17. 1986 Oklahoma accident
  18. Nuclear fallout
  19. Nukes
  20. Bombers
  21. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND)
  22. Balistic missiles, missiles and milletry rockets
  23. The atomic artillery peace ‘Atomic Annie’
  24. Atomic videos
  25. Atomic arsenals
  26. Atomic power stations
  27. Nuclear fallout
  28. Atomic accidents and disasters
  29. Atomic\nuclear power stations
  30. Mushroom cloud
  31. Atomic arsenals
  32. Bomb blast effects
  33. Atomic\nuclear war
  34. Atomic accidents and disasters
  35. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND)
  36. Atomic War
  37. Atomic warfare information notes.
  38. A nuclear\atomic holocaust or nuclear apocalypse
  39. Nukes
  40. Explosive blast\yield
  41. Atomic arsenals
  42. Bomb blast effects
  43. Atomic\nuclear war
  44. Atomic accidents and disasters
  45. Atomic\nuclear power stations
  46. Geiger-Muller counter
  47. "Poland is 'toast'!"
  48. Nuclear fallout
  49. Atomic videos
  50. Nuclear fallout
  51. Atomic accidents and disasters
  52. Atomic\nuclear power stations
  53. Mushroom cloud
  54. Atomic arsenals
  55. Bomb blast effects
  56. Atomic\nuclear war
  57. Atomic accidents and disasters
  58. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND)
  59. Atomic War
  60. Atomic warfare information notes.
  61. A nuclear\atomic holocaust or nuclear apocalypse
  62. Nukes
  63. Explosive blast\yield
  64. Atomic arsenals
  65. Bomb blast effects
  66. Atomic\nuclear war
  67. Atomic accidents and disasters
  68. Atomic\nuclear power stations
  69. Geiger-Muller counter
  70. "Poland is 'toast'!"
  71. Nuclear fallout
  72. Atomic videos
  73. A surprise nuclear attack

SourcesEdit

  1. http://www.icanw.org/the-facts/nuclear-arsenals/
  2. http://www.icanw.org/why-a-ban/positions/
  3. https://www.channel4.com/news/nuclear-weapons-national-archive-queen-stockpiles-bombs
  4. ttps://infographic.statista.com/normal/chartoftheday_3653_the_countries_with_the_biggest_nuclear_arsenals_n.jpg
  5. ttp://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/popup/2015/3/11_03_15-metro22.gif
  6. https://www.channel4.com/news/nuclear-weapons-national-archive-queen-stockpiles-bombs
  7. http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/threads/pakistan-outruns-india-in-nuclear-weapons-race-ican.69430/
  8. https://www.quora.com/Why-did-the-United-States-drop-two-atomic-bombs-on-Japan-in-World-War-II
  9. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
  10. http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/bombing-of-hiroshima-and-nagasaki
  11. https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/reasons-atomic-bombs-dropped-japan.html
  12. https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/reasons-atomic-bombs-dropped-japan.html
  13. http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/27/politics/hiroshima-obama-explainer/index.html
  14. https://www.quora.com/Why-did-the-United-States-drop-two-atomic-bombs-on-Japan-in-World-War-II
  15. http://orwell.ru/library/articles/ABomb/english/e_japan
  16. ttp://latimes-graphics-media.s3.amazonaws.com/interactives/nuclear_weapons/Nuclear_arsenals_web-image.png
  17. ttp://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-g-nuclear-arsenals-20141110-htmlstory.html
  18. ttp://www.channel4.com/media/c4-news/images/730_wide_images/Nuclear_01082013.jpg
  19. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_nuclear_weapons_stockpiles_and_nuclear_tests_by_country?oldformat=true
  20. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.2968/066004008
  21. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.2968/066004008
  22. http://johnstonsarchive.net/nuclear/nucstock-9.html
  23. http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/featured_articles/20020311monday.html
  24. http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/kazakhstan/nuclear/
  25. http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/ukraine/
  26. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_nuclear_weapons_stockpiles_and_nuclear_tests_by_country?oldformat=true
  27. http://edition.cnn.com/TECH/computing/9811/12/y2k.nukes/
  28. http://climatesceptics.org/europe/sweden/agesta/neutral-sweden-quietly-keeps-nuclear-option-open
  29. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Sweden_and_weapons_of_mass_destruction
  30. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Swedish_nuclear_weapons_program
  31. https://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/sweden/nuclear-weapons.htm
  32. http://fromthetrenchesworldreport.com/the-swedish-nuclear-weapons/127536
  33. http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2015/03/the-swedish-nuclear-weapons-3129046.html?currentSplittedPage=0
  34. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-17511816
  35. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2014/09/25/the-nuclear-weapons-states-who-has-them-and-how-many/#314cc8f65a80
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