FANDOM


IMPORTANT:This page has used Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia in either a refactored, modified, abridged, expanded, built on or 'strait from' text content!


Construction cone
This page is under construction. and is still being written! Any major unauthorized edits will be reverted.
Atlantis on Shuttle Carrier Aircraft

The Space Shuttle Atlantis on a Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. Author:NASA/Carla Thomas.

File:Airplane vortex edit.jpg
File:Cessna501 radar.JPG
Engine.f15.arp.750pix

A fighter jet engine undergoing testing. The tunnel behind the engine allows noise and exhaust to escape. Author: U.S. Air Force photo by Sue Sapp.

Hubble Space Telescope over Earth (during the STS-109 mission)

Hubble Space Telescope over Earth (during the STS-109 mission). Author: NASA.

TerminologyEdit

Aviation is the practical aspect or art of aeronautics, being the design, development, production, operation and use of aircraft, especially heavier-than-air aircraft. The word aviation was coined by French writer and former naval officer Gabriel La Landelle in 1863, from the verb avier (synonymous flying), itself derived from the Latin word avis ("bird") and the suffix -ation. 

Aeronautics (from the ancient Greek words ὰήρ āēr, which means "air", and ναυτική nautikē which means "navigation", i.e. "navigation into the air") is the science or art involved with the study, design, and manufacturing of air flight capable machines, and the techniques of operating aircraft and rockets within the atmosphere. The British Royal Aeronautical Society identifies the aspects of "aeronautical Art, Science and Engineering" and "the profession of Aeronautics (which expression includes Astronautics)."  While the term—literally meaning "sailing the air"—originally referred solely to the science of operating the aircraft, it has since been expanded to include technology, business, and other aspects related to aircraft. The term "aviation" is sometimes used interchangeably with aeronautics, although "aeronautics" includes lighter-than-air craft such as airships, and includes ballistic vehicles while "aviation" technically does not. A significant part of aeronautical science is a branch of dynamics called aerodynamics, which deals with the motion of air and the way that it interacts with objects in motion, such as an aircraft.

Avionics are the electronic systems used on aircraft, artificial satellites, and spacecraft. Avionic systems include communications, navigation, the display and management of multiple systems, and the hundreds of systems that are fitted to aircraft to perform individual functions. These can be as simple as a searchlight for a police helicopter or as complicated as the tactical system for an airborne early warning platform. The term avionics is a portmanteau of the words aviation and electronics.

Aerodynamics, from Greek ἀήρ aer (air) + δυναμική (dynamics), the study of the motion of air, particularly its interaction with a solid object, such as an airplane wing. Aerodynamics is a sub-field of fluid dynamics and gas dynamics, and many aspects of aerodynamics theory are common to these fields. The term aerodynamics is often used synonymously with gas dynamics, the difference being that "gas dynamics" applies to the study of the motion of all gases, and is not limited to air. The formal study of aerodynamics began in the modern sense in the eighteenth century, although observations of fundamental concepts such as aerodynamic drag were recorded much earlier. Most of the early efforts in aerodynamics were directed toward achieving heavier-than-air flight, which was first demonstrated by Otto Lilienthal in 1891. Since then, the use of aerodynamics through mathematical analysis, empirical approximations, wind tunnel experimentation, and computer simulations has formed a rational basis for the development of heavier-than-air flight and a number of other technologies. Recent work in aerodynamics has focused on issues related to compressible flow, turbulence, and boundary layers and has become increasingly computational in nature.

Aerospace engineering is the primary field of engineering concerned with the development of aircraft and spacecraft. It has two major and overlapping branches: aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering. Avionics engineering is similar, but deals with the electronics side of aerospace engineering.

Aeronautical engineering was the original term for the field Aerospace engineering, some times also called Aero-engineering. As flight technology advanced to include craft operating in outer space (astronautics), the broader term "aerospace engineering" has come into common use. Aerospace engineering, particularly the astronautics branch, is often colloquially referred to as "rocket science".  

Flight vehicles are subjected to demanding conditions such as those produced by changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature, with structural loads applied upon vehicle components. Consequently, they are usually the products of various technological and engineering disciplines including aerodynamics, propulsion, avionics, materials science, structural analysis and manufacturing. The interaction between these technologies is known as aerospace engineering. Because of the complexity and number of disciplines involved, aerospace engineering is carried out by teams of engineers, each having their own specialized area of expertise.

Astronautics (or cosmonautics) is the theory and practice of navigation beyond Earth's atmosphere.

The term astronautics (originally astronautique in French) was coined in the 1920s by J.-H. Rosny, president of the Goncourt academy, in analogy with aeronautics. Because there is a degree of technical overlap between the two fields, the term aerospace is often used to describe both at once. In 1930, Robert Esnault-Pelterie published the first book on the new research field.

As with aeronautics, the restrictions of mass, temperatures, and external forces require that applications in space survive extreme conditions: high-grade vacuum, the radiation bombardment of interplanetary space and the magnetic belts of low Earth orbit. Space launch vehicles must withstand titanic forces, while satellites can experience huge variations in temperature in very brief periods. Extreme constraints on mass cause astronautical engineers to face the constant need to save mass in the design in order to maximize the actual payload that reaches orbit.

Aeroacoustics is a branch of acoustics that studies noise generation via either turbulent fluid motion or aerodynamic forces interacting with surfaces. Noise generation can also be associated with periodically varying flows. A notable example of this phenomenon is the Aeolian tones produced by wind blowing over fixed objects.

Although no complete scientific theory of the generation of noise by aerodynamic flows has been established, most practical aeroacoustic analysis relies upon the so-called aeroacoustic analogy, proposed by Sir James Lighthill in the 1950s while at the University of Manchester. whereby the governing equations of motion of the fluid are coerced into a form reminiscent of the wave equation of "classical" (i.e. linear) acoustics in the left-hand side with the remaining terms as sources in the right-hand side.

  • This article is about the use of physics and chemistry to determine the nature of astronomical objects. For the use of physics to determine their positions and motions, see Celestial mechanics. For the physical study of the largest-scale structures of the universe, see Physical cosmology. For the journal, see Astrophysics (journal).

Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics and chemistry "to ascertain the nature of the heavenly bodies, rather than their positions or motions in space." Among the objects studied are the Sun, other stars, galaxies, extrasolar planets, the interstellar medium and the cosmic microwave background. Their emissions are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition. Because astrophysics is a very broad subject, astrophysicists typically apply many disciplines of physics, including mechanics, electromagnetism, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, relativity, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics.

In practice, modern astronomical research often involves a substantial amount of work in the realms of theoretical and observational physics. Some areas of study for astrophysicists include their attempts to determine: the properties of dark matter, dark energy, and black holes; whether or not time travel is possible, wormholes can form, or the multiverse exists; and the origin and ultimate fate of the universe. Topics also studied by theoretical astrophysicists include: Solar System formation and evolution; stellar dynamics and evolution; galaxy formation and evolution; magnetohydrodynamics; large-scale structure of matter in the universe; origin of cosmic rays; general relativity and physical cosmology, including string cosmology and astroparticle physics.

Also seeEdit

  1. 1985–86 Westland affair
  2. 9/11
  3. 9\11
  4. Air phone
  5. Air-ground radiotelephone service
  6. Aircraft
  7. Aircraft videos
  8. AirFone
  9. American X-aircraft
  10. Bell Helli-Vector
  11. Bell X-1
  12. Chuck Yeager
  13. Civil aircraft
  14. Controversial statues of the Cold War!
  15. Drones
  16. Lockheed Corporation
  17. Moravan Otrokovice
  18. Edwards AFB
  19. F-19A Specter
  20. Ferranti
  21. Flying Bedstead
  22. International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT)
  23. Aircraft ownership in the breakup of Yugoslavia
  24. Jet packs
  25. Lockheed Corporation
  26. Neil Armstrong
  27. North American F-86 Sabre
  28. North American X-15
  29. Shenyang J-8
  30. Tanker aircraft
  31. The Twin Towers
  32. Thoriated magnesium
  33. Thoriated magnesium (AKA- Mag-Thor)
  34. Tupolev
  35. VTOL
  36. World Trade Center (1973–2001)
  37. World Trade Center (1973–2001) tenants during 9\11
  38. World Trade Center (1973–2001), a ledger of building statistics

SourcesEdit

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerospace_engineering
  2. https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/markets/where-planes-trains-and-automobiles-go-to-die/ss-AAsBl78?ocid=spartanntp
  3. https://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/robert-esnault-pelterie/3-l-astronautique/
  4. https://web.archive.org/web/20060509023617/http://www.princetonreview.com/cte/profiles/dayInLife.asp?careerID=5
  5. https://study.com/articles/Aeronautical_Engineer_Educational_Requirements.html
  6. https://www.myfuture.com/careers/education/aerospace-engineers_17-2011.00
  7. https://history.nasa.gov/Remembering_Space_Age_A.pdf
  8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronautics
  9. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroacoustics
  10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrophysics
  11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroacoustics
  12. https://www.wired.com/story/photo-gallery-aerial-life-of-planes/?mbid=nl_110117_daily_list3_p5
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviation
  14. http://aviationweek.com/
  15. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1897ApJ.....6..271K
  16. https://science.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/
  17. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/astrophysics
  18. http://www.aviationjobsearch.com/
  19. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviation
  20. https://www.thefreedictionary.com/aviation
  21. https://www.ataviation.uk/
  22. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/aviation
  23. https://www.caa.co.uk/home/
  24. https://www.wired.com/story/photo-gallery-aerial-life-of-planes/?mbid=nl_110117_daily_list3_p5
  25. https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_pA9-D4QETAoC#page/n7/mode/2up
  26. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviation
  27. https://www.aerosociety.com/about-us/our-values/
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.