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DataEdit

Sting Ray torpedo.
Category. Data.
Type. Conventional Cold War  Torpedo.
Nationality. British.
Made in. 1983.
Retired. Still in use.
Designer. GEC-Marconi.
Manufacturer. The torpedo was built at the MSDS (later MUSL) plants at Neston (in Cheshire) and MUSL in Farlington and Waterlooville near Portsmouth. Guidance systems were made by Sperry Gyroscope Company.
Variants. 1.
Diameter. 12.8 in.
Speed. 45 knots (83 km/h).
Warhead. 45 kg (99 lb) of Torpex.
Operational range. (Maximum) 8–11 km (5.0–6.8 mi).
Guidance system. Active and passive sonar.
Launch platform. Frigates, destroyers, helicopters and Nimrod aircraft.
Weight. N\A, but probably akin to those of comparable role, configuration and era.
Sources. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sting_Ray_(torpedo), https://grabcad.com/library/stingray-torpedo#!, http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Sting_Ray_(torpedo), http://www.baesystems.com/en-uk/product/sting-ray-mod-1-lightweight-torpedo, http://www.wow.com/wiki/Stingray_torpedo and http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Sting_Ray_(torpedo)

OverviewEdit

The Sting Ray torpedo is a current British acoustic homing light-weight torpedo (LWT) manufactured by GEC-Marconi, who were later bought out by BAE Systems. It entered service in 1983.

BackgroundEdit

In the 1950s the Royal Navy was equipped with British designed and built Mk 30 air-dropped torpedoes. These were passive homing weapons which relied on detecting the noise from submarine targets. However, as submarine noise levels decreased these weapons became ineffective. A design for a British Mk 31 torpedo which would have used active echo-location sonar failed to receive Government approval for production. US Mk 44 torpedoes were purchased for the Royal Navy in the 1960s to fill this role, and later replaced by US Mk 46 torpedoes.

A desire to not be dependent on US torpedo purchases led to a research programme starting in 1964 to develop a British torpedo. Initially designated Naval and Air Staff Requirement (NASR) 7511, it was (much later in the late 1970s) designated the Sting Ray torpedo.

Design studies in the mid-1960s proposed that a tank of polyethylene oxide be carried behind the warhead. This polymer would be exuded at the nose to reduce the drag coefficient. Experiments using buoyancy-propelled torpedoes in 1969 had shown reductions in the drag coefficient up to 25%. However, by 1969 this scheme had been rejected in favour of carrying a larger battery.

Design studiesEdit

Design studies in the mid-1960s proposed that a tank of polyethylene oxide be carried behind the warhead. This polymer would be exuded at the nose to reduce the drag coefficient. Experiments using buoyancy-propelled torpedoes in 1969 had shown reductions in the drag coefficient up to 25%. However, by 1969 this scheme had been rejected in favour of carrying a larger battery.

The homing system developed in the mid-1960s incorporated a spinning magnetic disc onto which the acoustic correlation algorithms were etched but this was replaced by integrated circuit technology when the disc sometimes failed to survive the impact of the weapon with the sea from high altitude launches.

The original warhead concept was for a simple omnidirectional blast charge. However, studies in the 1970s showed that this would be inadequate against the large double-hulled submarines then entering service. A directed energy (shaped charge) warhead was used in the production weapon.

In 1976 the designs had to be completely revised. Swapping the project for buying a ready-made US torpedo was not considered because the torpedo was expected to be better, and was all-British. The project manager was Eric Risness CBE.

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