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Seabrook 2009-2

The Seabrook plant, New Hampshire has not had any serious atomic accidents that I know of yet (2015).

Over viewEdit

It is a statistical overview list of the world's major miscellaneous atomic disasters such as accidental mass contamination of workers in uranium mines and scavaging radioactive junk without due regard, knowledge or moral intent.

Former nations have the current nation relevant to the incident in brackets beside them, ie: Czechoslovakia (Slovakia).

Interwiki links go to the pages of those who indices occurred during the Cold War.

The article's scopeEdit

It covers the world's over INES rating 4 major miscellaneous atomic disasters. Lost, abused and damaged medical devices,industrial isotope scanners, industrial radio-sterilising devices or isotope capsules and the scavaging radioactive junk without due regard, knowledge or moral intent. Accidents in uranium mines and particle accelerators are included.

  • It dose not cover-
  1. Atomic power station, test reactors, filled atomic flask transportation, storage facilities, fuel rod manufacturing, junkyard and recycling depot accidents.
  2. Terrorisum or criminal acts such as deliberate food tainting without due regard, knowledge or moral intent.
  3. Either broken arrow nuke accidents and lost nukes.

The data chartsEdit

Individual accident score cardsEdit

A synoptic chart of major atomic reactor disasters up to 2017.
Accident in question. Pre-Cold War year. Cold War Years. Post-Cold War year. Nation involved. INES rating. Both immediate and proven cancer deaths.
May 2013 - J-PARC radioactive isotope leakage accident. 0 0 2013 Japan Level 4 0
Colorado contamination of several streets in Denver by local radium mining and manufacturing left. Various pre-1950 dates.  0 0 USA Not appropriate 0
April 2010 New Delhi Junkyard Accident 0 0 1 India Level 4 1
1987 Goiânia accident. 0. 1987. 0. Brazil. Level 4. 4.
1979 Tucson Tritium leak 0 1979 0 USA Level 4 0
1989 In the Kramatorsk radiological accident. 0. 1989. 0. USSR (Ukraine). Level 4. 6
July 16, 1979, Church Rock, New Mexico, accidental release of radioactive mine tailings. 0. 1979. 0. USA. Level 4. 0
Radium poisoning of Eben Byers, who ingested almost 1,400 bottles of Radithor, a radioactive patent medicine. 1927–1930 0 0 USA Not appropriate. 1
The overexposure of workers luminescent radium was used to paint watches and other items that glowed. Various pre-1950 dates 0 0 Various American locations including Ottawa, Illinois. Not appropriate. N\A, but many got cancer over the years.
A small capsule containing highly radioactive 137Cs was found in a safety jacket's pocket. 0 0 Early 1990s to 2012- Georgian (nation not US state) It has no official INES rating. It was probably a 3 at first, but probably became a 4 when it was thrown away incorrectly. 0
November 2003, a lost and completely dismantled RTG located on the Island of Yuzhny Goryachinsky in the Kola Bay. 0. 0. 2003. Russia. It has no official INES rating, but was probably a 4. 0.
Rocky Flats Plant Incidents, Colorado. 0. 0. 1957, 1964 to 1967, 1969 and 1973 to 1997. USA. They don't no official INES rating, but were all probably a 5 events. All 0.

Number and % of total worldwide to dateEdit

A synoptic chart of major atomic reactor disasters up to 2017.
Nation. Pre-Cold War year number and %. Cold War Years number and %. Post-Cold War year number and %. Total number and %.
Japan.  0. 0 1= 25% 1= 6.66%
Georgian (nation not US state). 0. 0 1= 25%. 1= 6.66%
USA. 3= 100% 6= 66.66% 0 6= 40%
Russia. 0. 0 1= 25%. 1= 6.66%
Brazil. 0. 1= 11.11% 0 1= 6.66%
USSR. 0. 2= 22.22% 0 2= 13.33%
India 0 0 1= 25%

W.T.F.!Edit

1927 to 1930  radium poisoning Eben Byers ingested almost 1,400 bottles of Radithor, a radioactive patent medicine, leading to his death in 1932. He is buried in Allegheny Cemetery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in a lead-lined coffin.

1989 – In the Kramatorsk radiological accident, a small capsule containing highly radioactive 137Cs was found inside the concrete wall in an apartment building in Kramatorsk, Ukrainian SSR. It is believed that the capsule, originally contained in a measurement device, was lost sometime during the late 1970s and ended up mixed in with gravel used to construct that building in 1980. By the time the capsule was discovered, six residents of the building had died from leukemia and 17 more received varying doses of radiation.

In November 2003, a completely dismantled RTG located on the Island of Yuzhny Goryachinsky in the Kola Bay was found. The generator's radioactive heat source was found on the ground near the shoreline in the northern part of the island.

Early 1990s to 2012- A small capsule containing highly radioactive 137Cs was found in a Georgian (nation not US state) safety jacket's pocket. Several people were badly burnt by it since the early 1990s, but none died. The jacket and capsule were disposed of in ordinary rubbish during, not atomic rubbish.

VideosEdit

1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown The SL-1 Accident - United States Army Documentary - WDTVLIVE42-0

1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown The SL-1 Accident - United States Army Documentary - WDTVLIVE42-0

1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown : The SL-1 Accident - United States Army Documentary - WDTVLIVE42.

Nuclear Reactor Meltdown "SL-1 Accident Briefing Film Report" 1961 AEC Atomic Energy Commission

Nuclear Reactor Meltdown "SL-1 Accident Briefing Film Report" 1961 AEC Atomic Energy Commission

Nuclear Reactor Meltdown: "SL-1 Accident Briefing Film Report" 1961 AEC Atomic Energy Commission.

SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

SL-1 Accident Briefing Report - 1961 Nuclear Reactor Meltdown Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

Holistic global incidents mapEdit

Atomic accident map

Major atomic accidents from 1942 to 2017.

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Also seeEdit

  1. Energy
  2. Atomic accidents and disasters
  3. Synoptic charts of major atomic reactor and waste disasters up to 2017

SourcesEdit

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_civilian_radiation_accidents
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_nuclear_disasters_and_radioactive_incidents
  3. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/List_of_civilian_radiation_accidents
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J-PARC
  5. http://www.j-parc.jp/index-e.html
  6. http://bellona.org/news/nuclear-issues/radioactive-waste-and-spent-nuclear-fuel/2005-04-radioisotope-thermoelectric-generators-2
  7. https://energy.gov/lm/articles/update-rocky-flats-cercla-five-year-review
  8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Flats_Plant
  9. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_contamination_from_the_Rocky_Flats_Plant
  10. https://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/28/world/asia/28india.html
  11. https://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/24/world/asia/24india.html
  12. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/Origin-of-Cobalt-60-traced-to-Delhi-University/articleshow/5869157.cms?referral=PM
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_civilian_radiation_accidents
  14. https://www.nordion.com/our_products/discontinued_products.asp
  15. https://web.archive.org/web/20140106034537/http://www.nordion.com/our_products/discontinued_products.asp
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